Pink Sheet is part of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC’s registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use. For high-quality copies or electronic reprints for distribution to colleagues or customers, please call +44 (0) 20 3377 3183

Printed By

UsernamePublicRestriction
UsernamePublicRestriction

G-Protein Coupled Receptors

This article was originally published in Start Up

Executive Summary

It has always been popular to start companies around families and subfamilies of targets, banking on the similarity among the receptors to speed drug discovery. But the idea largely hasn't panned out, in part because of the new target risk--sometimes they're not pharmaceutically relevant and sometimes they resist the available chemistries. That's why G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been so important: they're clearly relevant (many, perhaps most, blockbusters come from this class of receptor) and their unique structure makes them both relatively easy to hit with ligands and likely to do something when hit. But the same structural advantages turn into scientific disadvantages for researchers: they resist screening and other techniques of modern drug discovery. We explore some of the newest approaches to mining this rich vein of opportunity.

You may also be interested in...



Forest Takes Option On Trevena’s Heart Failure Drug, And Some Equity

Already strong in both CNS and cardiovascular drugs, Forest obtained an option to license the Pennsylvania start-up’s lead program in acute heart failure. In the process, Forest took a stake in Trevena as the young company shifts its focus toward pain drugs based on Nobel Prize-winning research.

With $35 Million B Round, Trevena to Push GPCR-Targeted Program into Phase II for Acute Heart Failure

Four investors returned to back the Duke University spinout, which is developing biased ligand small molecules.

With $35 Million B Round, Trevena to Push GPCR-Targeted Program into Phase II for Acute Heart Failure

Four investors returned to back the Duke University spinout, which is developing biased ligand small molecules.

Related Content

Topics

Related Companies

Related Deals

UsernamePublicRestriction

Register

SC090560

Ask The Analyst

Please Note: You can also Click below Link for Ask the Analyst
Ask The Analyst

Your question has been successfully sent to the email address below and we will get back as soon as possible. my@email.address.

All fields are required.

Please make sure all fields are completed.

Please make sure you have filled out all fields

Please make sure you have filled out all fields

Please enter a valid e-mail address

Please enter a valid Phone Number

Ask your question to our analysts

Cancel