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Drug sponsors remain hopeful for regulatory reform in India following US NIH cut-back on trials

This article was originally published in SRA

Executive Summary

In what is probably one of its more lucid responses on the recent scrapping of a large number of clinical studies in India, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), the largest source of funding for medical research in the world, has said that the Indian trials it stopped were mainly because of the country's evolving trial regulations1.

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