Pink Sheet is part of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC’s registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use. For high-quality copies or electronic reprints for distribution to colleagues or customers, please call +44 (0) 20 3377 3183

Printed By

UsernamePublicRestriction

Without Strattera, Will Lilly Merge?

This article was originally published in The Pink Sheet Daily

Executive Summary

Lilly may be pushed to reconsider doing a major merger or acquisition as it faces unexpected generic competition for its key ADHD drug.

You may also be interested in...



Legal And Regulatory Briefs: Evista, Norvir, Gene Therapy

Court upholds Lilly's Evista patents: In a Sept. 1 decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit affirmed a lower court ruling that Evista's method-of-use patents are valid. The patents provide the osteoporosis drug with patent protection through March 2014. Teva had appealed a district court ruling that it infringed claims in four Lilly patents (1"The Pink Sheet," Oct. 5, 2009). The Federal Circuit also affirmed the district court's finding that Evista (raloxifene) patents covering particle size distribution are invalid for lack of enablement. Separately, in an Aug. 31 order, the Federal Circuit granted Lilly's request for an injunction to prevent Teva and other generic manufacturers from launching generic versions of Strattera (atomoxetine) while Lilly appeals a district ruling that a key patent on the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder drug is invalid. The federal court in New Jersey ruled that the patent, set to expire in May 2017, is invalid for lack of enablement (2"The Pink Sheet" DAILY, Aug. 13, 2010)

Legal And Regulatory Briefs: Evista, Norvir, Gene Therapy

Court upholds Lilly's Evista patents: In a Sept. 1 decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit affirmed a lower court ruling that Evista's method-of-use patents are valid. The patents provide the osteoporosis drug with patent protection through March 2014. Teva had appealed a district court ruling that it infringed claims in four Lilly patents (1"The Pink Sheet," Oct. 5, 2009). The Federal Circuit also affirmed the district court's finding that Evista (raloxifene) patents covering particle size distribution are invalid for lack of enablement. Separately, in an Aug. 31 order, the Federal Circuit granted Lilly's request for an injunction to prevent Teva and other generic manufacturers from launching generic versions of Strattera (atomoxetine) while Lilly appeals a district ruling that a key patent on the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder drug is invalid. The federal court in New Jersey ruled that the patent, set to expire in May 2017, is invalid for lack of enablement (2"The Pink Sheet" DAILY, Aug. 13, 2010)

Lilly's Semagacestat Is Latest Alzheimer's Drug To Fail; Is Class At Risk?

Eli Lilly said August 17 it would halt development of its Phase III Alzheimer's drug candidate semagacestat, casting some doubt on the efficacy of novel gamma secretase inhibitor drugs and slowing Lilly's late-stage pipeline as the firm struggles to replace future revenues that will be lost to drugs going off patent

Related Content

Topics

UsernamePublicRestriction

Register

PS071036

Ask The Analyst

Ask the Analyst is free for subscribers.  Submit your question and one of our analysts will be in touch.

Your question has been successfully sent to the email address below and we will get back as soon as possible. my@email.address.

All fields are required.

Please make sure all fields are completed.

Please make sure you have filled out all fields

Please make sure you have filled out all fields

Please enter a valid e-mail address

Please enter a valid Phone Number

Ask your question to our analysts

Cancel