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Today’s Statin Debate Bears Lessons For Tomorrow’s Cholesterol Drugs

Executive Summary

Clinicians recently took to the pages of the Journal of the American Medical Association to argue the appropriateness of using statin therapy as primary prevention in patients who are not already at high risk for a cardiovascular event. Such scrutiny comes as NIH prepares to issue new treatment guidelines to a market newly saturated with popular generic options, and as pharmaceutical companies assess how best to approach the dyslipidemia field.

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In shifting away from specific targets and non-statin add-on therapies, new ACC/AHA cholesterol guidelines support treatment of people at relatively low risk for events and more intensive therapy for those at higher risk.

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