Pink Sheet is part of the Business Intelligence Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC’s registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use. For high-quality copies or electronic reprints for distribution to colleagues or customers, please call +44 (0) 20 3377 3183

Printed By

UsernamePublicRestriction
UsernamePublicRestriction

NIH CONSENSUS PANEL RECOMMENDS DAILY USE OF SPF 15 SUNSCREEN; RETIN-A DATA "INSUFFICIENT" TO DETERMINE SUSTAINED PHOTOAGING IMPROVEMENT, PANEL FINDS

Executive Summary

A National Institutes of Health Consensus Panel recommended the daily use of waterproof sun protection factor (SPF) 15 sunscreens during "appropriate times of the year" and year-round in the Sunbelt at the conclusion of the May 8-10 conference, "Sunlight, Ultraviolet Radiation and the Skin." While urging the use of sunscreens with SPFs of 15 and above to protect skin against potentially damaging ultraviolet rays (UVR), the panel noted that the SPF rating applies only to ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. Consumers should select a broad spectrum sunscreen also to absorb harmful ultraviolet A (UVA) rays, the panel suggested. The group noted in its consensus that UVA radiation can cause DNA damage, erythema and squamous cell cancer in mice and guinea pigs. The panel advised that use of sunscreens to protect children is particularly important since "it is estimated that as much as 50% of an individual's total sun exposure occurs by 18 years of age." Attitudes toward sun exposure should be altered through education of children, adolescents and adults, the panel suggested. Increased UVR damage may occur with use of certain systemic medications, the consensus statement pointed out, including oral antibiotics, antihypertensives, psoralens, immunosuppressive agents, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and "myriad other agents." Topical medications such as psoralens, tretinoin (Retin-A) and other sensitizing and depigmenting agents also call for increased caution, the panel concluded. Suggested directions for future research include: development of "more effective nontoxic sunscreens and nontoxic anti-carcinogenic agents"; studies on the biological effects of UVA radiation; updating epidemiologic data concerning non-melanoma skin cancer in the U.S. beyond current 1978 data; and studies to define "more precisely the phenomenon known as 'photoaging' of the skin and to compare this with chronologic aging." The panel also concluded that currently there is insufficient data to determine sustained improvement in photoaged skin from the use of Ortho's Retin-A. Consensus Panel Chairman David Bickers, MD, Case Western Reserve University, said: "The long-term effects, the long-term toxicity of repeated application of this class of compound to older skin, is in no way available at the present time." He added: "We are talking about several years before we'll be in a position to make any kind of recommendation in that regard." The official consensus on Retin-A was that "although the beneficial cosmetic effects of some of these treatments have received wide publicity, there are insufficient data demonstrating sustained improvement, reversibility of tissue pathology, or the preservation of normal skin function by those agents. There is no information regarding long-term positive, negative, or toxic effects." The panel concurred, noting: "Conflicting data exist regarding the prevention/potentiation of topical retinoids in the development of UVR-induced skin tumors in animals." John Voorhees, PhD, the main researcher conducting studies on Retin-A for the treatment of photoaging, presented his findings at the Consensus Conference. In an open discussion, Voorhees noted that none of his subjects ceased therapy, so no determination could be made of how long Retin-A's effects last after therapy is stopped. In a related development, University Patents, Inc. (UPI) filed suit in Philadephia District Court May 10 on behalf of itself and the University of Pennsylvania against Retin-A inventor Albert Kligman, MD, PhD. The two affiliated organizations are seeking $ 10 mil. in damages and may receive up to $ 20 mil. combined. Ortho is not a plaintiff.
Advertisement
Advertisement
UsernamePublicRestriction

Register

PS015609

Ask The Analyst

Please Note: You can also Click below Link for Ask the Analyst
Ask The Analyst

Your question has been successfully sent to the email address below and we will get back as soon as possible. my@email.address.

All fields are required.

Please make sure all fields are completed.

Please make sure you have filled out all fields

Please make sure you have filled out all fields

Please enter a valid e-mail address

Please enter a valid Phone Number

Ask your question to our analysts

Cancel