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CALIFORNIA PROPOSAL THAT WOULD EFFECTIVELY BAN UNDERARM AEROSOLS

Executive Summary

CALIFORNIA PROPOSAL THAT WOULD EFFECTIVELY BAN UNDERARM AEROSOLS was discussed at a June 25 meeting between the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and industry representatives including the Cosmetic, Toiletry and Fragrance Assn. (CTFA) and the Chemical Specialties Mfrs. Assn. (CSMA). In response to the proposal, CTFA and CSMA announced that they are funding a study on its economic impact. Industry groups also said they plan to file a joint memo responding to the CARB proposal before July 17. On May 16, CARB proposed rules that would limit the photochemically reactive organic compounds (PROCs) in aerosol antiperspirants and deodorants to 2% by weight. Based on calculations made in conjunction with CSMA, the CARB staff estimated that the total average PROCs present in aerosol antiperspirants is 75%, and in aerosol deodorants, 95%. The PROCs in underarm products include propellants, solvents and fragrances. California represents approximately 10% of the domestic antiperspirant/deodorant market, according to CARB's draft proposal. The underarm aerosol product restriction would be part of an overall effort by regulatory agencies in California to provide a "menu" of control measures for use by local districts in adopting regs to meet ambient air quality standards. The state restriction would apply to all underarm products, including pump sprays, sticks, roll-ons, creams, pads and plastic squeeze-bottles, although current estimates for non-aerosols indicate far lower PROC levels than those in aerosols. For example, stick deodorants contain from 0-43%, and stick antiperspirants contain 0-13% PROCs, the report says. The CARB staff is also planning to develop control measures for hair sprays and other household products. CTFA noted that industry is requesting the CARB staff to delay making final recommendations to the full board until industry submits new data. CTFA said it expects CARB to redraft the proposal and perhaps meet with industry representatives again before presenting a revised draft to a CARB technical review panel, which will decide whether to send the proposal to the full board.
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