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PFIZER's GLUCOTROL ORAL HYPOGLYCEMIC ACCEPTED BY 21.1% OF HOSPITAL FORMULARIES THREE MONTHS AFTER INTRO; ZANTAC ORAL MOST SUCCESSFUL LAUNCH TO HOSPITALS

Executive Summary

Pfizer's Glucotrol (glypizide) was accepted by 21.1% of hospital formularies three months after it was launched, according to a recent survey of a panel of approximately 200 hospital formularies conducted by Hospita Research Associates, a Fairfield, N.J.-based consulting firm. Among the other second generation oral hypoglycemics just entering the market, the research group noted that Hoechst-Roussel's DiaBeta and Upjohn's Micronase (brands of glyburide), achieved acceptance levels of 16.3% and 15.8%, respectively, in their first three months on the market. Requested by generic name only, glyburide had a 14.9% acceptance level within three months. By contrast, in the retail segment, Micronase held the lead during its first three months on the market, according to Pharmaceutical Data Services. PDS reported in August that Micronase held the early lead in the second-generation oral hypoglycemic market with $557,000 in sales at retail acquisition cost during August ("The Pink Sheet" Oct. 1, T&G-2). PDS said DiaBeta had $371,000 in sales during August and Glucotrol had $302,000 in sales. The results of Hospital Research Associates' survey are included in a report entitled Medical Trends in Hospital Formulary Committees. The report was begun in May 1983 to measure the acceptance rate of new drugs by hospital formularies. The report found that the two most successful product launches in terms of percent of acceptance on formularies were Glaxo/Roche's Zantac and Burroughs Wellcome's Tracrium (attacurium besylate). Zantac was added to 35.8% of hospital formularies surveyed after its first three months on the market and 62.4% after nine months. The neuromuscular blocker Tracrium had an acceptance level of 26.6% after three months and 48.9% after nine months. Cephalosporins were also included in the survey list of hospital formulary products. The research group found that Glaxo's second-generation cephalosporin Zinacef (cefuroxime) was accepted by 22.7% of hospital formularies nine months after its introduction, while SmithKline Beckman's third-generation cephalosporin Cefizox (ceftizoxime) achieved an acceptance level of 13.4% after nine months. SmithKline reduced Cefizox price to whslrs. in November to a base cost per gram of $8.70, announcing in a letter to buyers that the reduction made Cefizox the lowest priced third-generation cephalosporin ("The Pink Sheet" Nov. 5, p. 5). The hospital research group also noted the deletion rates from hospital formularies during the period August 1983 to July 1984. Among cephalosporins, 13.9% of formularies surveyed withdrew Lilly's Moxam, 9.5% withdrew Lilly's Keflin, 4.9% withdrew Pfizer's Cefobid, and 3.9% withdrew Hoechst-Roussel's Claforan. Chart omitted.

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